Thursday, March 14, 2013

Thursday Arch Series, Plus A Papal Bonus

Gateway Arch 2013-03-09 1

A shot of the Arch from the north, taken in an old, worn-down industrial area. The train looks to be made up of hopper cars. They could be carrying grain, chemicals or who knows what. The bridge in yesterday's picture, not far away, carries only railroad traffic. These cars may have just crossed the Mississippi.

So, habemus papem (second conjugation, first person plural; first declension, accusative singular) - we have a pope. See what junk the Jesuits, like Jorge Mario Bergoglio, crammed into my head?. The new dude in charge comes from Buenos Aires, one of my favorite cities. I took the photo below in BsAs' Metropolitan Cathedral three years ago (odd that it's not named for a holy person or event.) Note the depth of religious devotion.

Are the locals sad to see Bergoglio move to Rome? Well, he says . . .        

News In The Cathedral

5 comments:

cieldequimper said...

The arch shot is one of my all time favourites.

Yes... are there any religious ads in the paper?!

Nathalie Beaumes said...

So much to comment on I don't know where to start.

The arch shot is fantastic. Like CDQ I think it'll take a proud place in your arch series.

The second one is amazing - who would have thought of coming to church to read the paper? I guess it's a quiet and cool place.. and then thanks for the superb video clip.

Yes habemus papam. The French news is full of it. France used to be called "fille aînée de l'église", the church's eldest daughter you know.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Super Arch shot Bob, looks good side by side with the power pylon. Looks like the perfect place to read the paper :)

William Kendall said...

The Arch shot looks splendid, Bob.

I'm sure he was catching up with last night's sports scores. Probably had a bit of money riding on a game...

Jack said...

This is a nice arch shot. And, though I am not Catholic, I respect that choice that they have made and wish the new Pope all the best in a tremendously difficult job at a very difficult time.